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Fish oil and Glucosamine Offer Osteoarthritis Relief

Published clinical research shows that fish oil and glucosamine work together to provide additional benefits for people with osteoarthritis.

Researchers published the results of the clinical trial using a combination of glucosamine sulfate and omega-3 fatty acids to reduce pain and stiffness in patients with moderate to severe hip or knee osteoarthritis.

A total of 177 patients were included in the double-blind comparison study, in which half the patients received just 1500 mg of glucosamine, and the other half received 1500 mg of glucosamine plus 200 mg of omega 3s. Both groups had about the same number of participants who reported a 20 percent or less reduction in pain.1

However, when researchers questioned the individuals who experienced an 80% reduction in pain, they found that the group that took both the glucosamine and omega-3s reported between 48.5 and 55.6% reduced morning stiffness and pain in the hips and knees, compared to 41.7 to 55.3% for those in the glucosamine only group.

Other studies have indicated that a combination of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate also works to relieve the symptoms of osteoarthritis.

What are glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate?

Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate are natural substances found in and around the cells of cartilage. Glucosamine is an amino sugar that the body produces and distributes in cartilage and other connective tissue, and chondroitin sulfate is a complex carbohydrate that helps cartilage retain water.

Published study results indicate that the combination of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate might be most effective in osteoarthritis patients who had moderate to severe knee pain, and is just as effective as NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as Ibuprofen and Celebrex.

A 2006 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine tested the short-term (6 months) effectiveness of glucosamine and chondroitin in reducing pain in a large number of patients with knee osteoarthritis. This research was funded by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS).

The study found that the combination of the two dietary supplements did not provide significant relief of pain among all participants. But it did provide statistically significant pain relief compared to placebo for participants in the moderate-to-severe pain subgroup. About 79% in this group had a 20 percent or greater pain reduction compared to 54% for placebo.2

Osteoarthritis

An estimated 27 million adults in the United States live with osteoarthritis—the most common type of arthritis. Osteoarthritis, also called degenerative joint disease, is caused by the breakdown of cartilage, which is the connective tissue that cushions the ends of bones within the joint. Osteoarthritis is characterized by pain, joint damage, and limited motion. The disease generally occurs late in life, and most commonly affects the hands and large weight-bearing joints, such as the knees. Age, female gender, and obesity are risk factors for this condition.

While half a loaf is certainly better than none, for healthy pain-free joints well into your 80s or 90s, why not get all the nutritional support your body needs rather than just some of it – safely and effectively?

Fish oil and glucosamine work together to provide additional benefits for people with osteoarthritis.

Researchers published the results of the clinical trial using a combination of glucosamine sulfate and omega-3 fatty acids to reduce pain and stiffness in patients with moderate to severe hip or knee osteoarthritis.

References

  1. Gruenwald J, Petzold E, Busch R, Petzold HP, Graubaum HJ. Effect of glucosamine sulfate with or without omega-3 fatty acids in patients with osteoarthritis. Adv Ther. 2009 Sep;26(9):858-71. Epub 2009 Sep 4.
  2. Clegg D, et al. Glucosamine, Chondroitin Sulfate, and the Two in Combination for Painful Knee Osteoarthritis. New England Journal of Medicine, 2006 Feb 23;354(8):795-808.

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