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Metabolic Rescue: Breaking the Epidemic of the Metabolic Syndrome Cycle

You are at risk right now if you …

  • Can notice a slight thickening around your midsection that seems impossible to get rid of … no matter how hard you try
  • Are sluggish and tired a lot more than you used to be … or than you should be
  • Crave carbs like spaghetti and white bread … almost like an addiction
  • Get hungry half an hour after a big meal … no matter how much you ate
  • Can’t seem to move from the front of the TV … instead of doing things you used to love like walking, or swimming, or playing tennis
  • Feel older than you should … but don’t have the energy to do anything to make it better

Not only are you at risk right now, but so are your loved ones … regardless of how old or young they are.

Dear Friend,

There’s a good chance you’ve heard about “Metabolic Syndrome” in recent months.

There’s also a good chance you just let the phrase go by without thinking much about it. After all, it’s not very serious sounding. How bad can it be?

I’m going to tell you briefly about a friend of mine we’ll call Tim—a friend and business associate—who almost died last year right around Christmas time because of Metabolic Syndrome.

And although Tim is a man, his story is similar to those of women who’ve been overwhelmed by Metabolic Syndrome. I’m telling you because I want you to understand how seriously Metabolic Syndrome threatens your health, and to alert you to the fact that metabolic rescue is available.

My hope is that you can learn from Tim’s experiences. With proper attention—and some remarkable herbs and minerals—you can beat Metabolic Syndrome. And if you start before Metabolic Syndrome gets a firm hold in your body, you can stop it from …

Well, putting it bluntly, you can stop it from killing you … or someone you care about.

Are you too busy to stay healthy?

Through most of Tim’s younger life he was an active man. But times change. So do responsibilities. Tim found he had less time to exercise as he took on a new career. Or so he told himself.

Gradually … very, very gradually … he noticed some changes taking place in his body. Small changes you, too, may have noticed. His waistline thickened slightly. He gained some weight. Not a lot at first. Certainly not enough to call him fat. It’s all part of middle age, he told himself.

“Gradually, very, very gradually, he noticed some changes taking place in his body. Small changes you, too, may have noticed.”

He dieted and dropped most of the weight. But it came back. More this time than before. His belly was no longer just thicker. It stuck out.

Exercise became difficult because—he told himself—he didn’t have the time to do it right. And when he did exercise, he’d get winded and tired easily. He dieted. Tried everything. But the weight wouldn’t go away.

Tim was frustrated, angry, depressed, discouraged and felt like a failure when it came to his health

Then the very slow progression overtook him and grabbed him like a big, angry bear. Finally, two days after Christmas last year, he got medical attention.

“This is heart failure,” the doctor said. Further examination uncovered Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and high triglycerides.

Tim was diagnosed with what is now called Metabolic Syndrome and what he very much needed was metabolic rescue.

The number one symptom of Metabolic Syndrome … DENIAL

Tim’s case is very typical of most people with this devious, insidious medical condition. It sneaks up on you and can take years to show its face. When it does start impacting your life, it’s easier to push the threat to the back of your mind than deal with it.

But all the while you have a nagging worry … and a sense of failure, just like Tim did. “There must be something wrong with me that I can’t lose weight,” you say to yourself. “I must be weak. No will power.” And you know that’s how others think about you.

But if you take nothing else away from my discussion here, please, please understand this …

Metabolic Syndrome is not your fault

You’ll see in a moment why you are not to blame if you get Metabolic Syndrome. I’m also going to tell you what some of the world’s most prestigious medical and nutritional researchers feel cause it. And how—armed with knowledge—you can experience metabolic rescue and reverse Metabolic Syndrome’s deadly impact on your life.

“… armed with knowledge, you can experience metabolic rescue and reverse Metabolic Syndrome’s deadly impact on your life.”

But first, let me tell you exactly what Metabolic Syndrome is … and what it is not.

Metabolic Syndrome is not a disease. It’s a “syndrome”—a combination of symptoms. That distinction makes it more difficult to attack and control. But metabolic rescue can be achieved.

In the case of Metabolic Syndrome, any one of the symptoms separately carries deadly potential. That’s why an alternative name for Metabolic Syndrome is the Deadly Quartet.1 Other names include Syndrome X, and insulin-resistance syndrome.2

“In the case of Metabolic Syndrome, any one of the symptoms separately carries deadly potential. That’s why an alternative name for Metabolic Syndrome is the Deadly Quartet. 3

And it’s not just your life you need to worry about

Although the term Metabolic Syndrome is most commonly used in the cardiovascular field, Deadly Quartet really describes this syndrome’s impact on your life and the lives of over 47 million Americans4… and their loved ones. There is no denying Metabolic Syndrome affects everybody in the victim’s family.

Why is it called a Deadly Quartet? Because medical researchers all agree that Metabolic Syndrome involves very serious, usually fatal (in the long run) conditions. These are:

  • High blood pressure
  • Elevated blood glucose and insulin resistance
  • Low HDL (good cholesterol) and high LDL (bad cholesterol)
  • Increased waist circumference

How could increased waist circumference be a deadly factor in your life? I’ll show you shortly some research that focused on how adipose (fatty) tissue produced life-threatening substances. It turns out that being “just a little overweight” has far greater impact on your life than simply putting a “strain on your heart.”

Other conditions are often grouped in with this deadly quartet. One of the most important ones is a pro-inflammatory state, characterized by elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). The other is a pro-thrombotic state, characterized by elevated levels of substances in blood that lead to artery blockage and strokes.5

In fact if you have Metabolic Syndrome, medical research has determined that you’re at three times the risk of acquiring heart disease or getting a stroke. And your risk of dying from heart disease if you suffer from Metabolic Syndrome is 5½ times greater than people with heart disease who do not have Metabolic Syndrome.6

“… your risk of dying from heart disease if you suffer from Metabolic Syndrome is 5½ times greater than people with heart disease that do not have Metabolic Syndrome. 7

Metabolic Syndrome’s danger does not stop there. A 14-year study of Finnish men determined that “Cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality are increased in men with the Metabolic Syndrome, even in the absence of baseline CVD (cardiovascular disease) and diabetes.”8

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4 Comments

Excellent article Thank You!

After reading this article - this may be what I’m looking for.  I’m 65 and an exerciser.  I’ve never had sugar cravings and weight gain but I’m fitting this profile to a “t’.  I will try this product for a month and see if I get any results.

Excellent article.  Dr. Wheeler is very thorough in his research.  Some of these symptoms apply to me, esp. the inability to lose weight.  I appreciate the insight.

This article on INSULIN RESISTANCE does not TELL US WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT!!!??
JZ

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